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adulthoodisokay:

Here is a guinea pig twerking.
Where is your god now?
Creepy Christmas: Because Dead Stuff Is Better Than Santa

(Source: iopenattheclose15-07-11, via workitsmoochiee)

dichotomization:

In 1933, a girl dressed all in blue came to Willoughby, Ohio on a Greyhound bus. She stayed the night in a boarding house before spending the next day greeting everyone with heartfelt warmth. At the end of the day, she saw the train to New York approach, dropped her cases, sprinted for the track, was hit by the train and died of her injuries. No one knew her name for 60 years, yet 3,000 people attended her funeral. And no one will ever know if it was an accident or suicide.
mossyoakswampdonkey:

usmarineis5150:

decayingmalady:

vgkait:

dj-smackdown:

glittergirl86:

This, children, is how we used to connect to the internet.

this gif should be slowed down immensely for accuracy.



I can hear the sound as I watch this and it makes me want to scream.

"Get off the AOL, someone might be trying to call."

Children don’t know true pain from the internet until they sit through this

neolita:

Jingle dog enjoying a warmer of our cold days.

thegospelaccordingtoemma:

Friday is Pizza Day, the best day of the week! 🍕🍕
campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

Fall Out Boy by Rhianna O’Shea

(Source: rhiannaresolution.buzznet.com)

(Source: yoslash, via crystallollipops)